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NFL owner says his only regret about comparing players to ‘inmates’ is apologizing for it | LIBERAL.GUIDE

Last year, Houston Texans owner Bob McNair caused quite a stir when ESPN reported that in a mid-season meeting with other NFL owners about on-field protests during the national anthem, McNair told his colleagues, “We can’t have the inmates running the prison.” In response, most Texans players took a knee during the national anthem before the team’s next game, and many spoke publicly (albeit…

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NFL owner says his only regret about comparing players to ‘inmates’ is apologizing for it | LIBERAL.GUIDE


Bid & Win Crypto Currency from BID4CC.COM

Recently launched Bid4CC has already created quite a stir in crypto circles with awesome cryptocurrency deals (marked down by up to 90% off the market price). CAYMAN ISLANDS, CAYMAN ISLANDS, February 8, 2018 /EINPresswire.com/ — Recently … VISIT THE SOURCE ARTICLE Author:

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Want to learn about African immigrants? Mr. President, meet Africa’s tech sector | DRONEPETS.ORG

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comments about immigrants coming from “shithole” countries are continuing to stir up a shitstorm internationally.” data-reactid=”6″>President Trump’s comments about immigrants coming from “shithole” countries are continuing to stir up a shitstorm internationally.

And while the language itself is bad enough, the President and his advisors need to also reboot their assumptions about the African continent — not just for the immigration debate but for U.S. foreign policy considerations.

Among other sweeping changes, Africa is in the midst of a tech boom that’s reshaping the culture, politics, and economies of many of its countries. African immigrants are key drivers of this digital movement. And African tech companies are now generating revenue and creating jobs in the USA.

Sure, just like any region in the world, the continent has its goods and bads.  Many of Africa’s stereotypical problems—conflict, poverty, corruption—have not vanished. But nearly two decades of improved stability, economic growth, and reform have come together to create some bright spots. Rapid modernization and a growing technology scene are among them.

blockchain, logistics, and education to healthcare and agriculture.” data-reactid=”17″>Africa now has over 316 tech hubs, accelerators, and innovation spaces across IT hotspots in Ghana, Kenya, South Africa, Nigeria, and Rwanda. Thousands of African startups are moving into every imaginable sector: from blockchain, logistics, and education to healthcare and agriculture.

And hundreds of millions of dollars in venture capital is flowing to these startups, with the expectation that some of their solutions for Africa’s 1.2 billion people will produce significant ROI.

e-commerce venture Jumia—in 2016.  And at least one big technology company in Africa, Naspers, regularly makes outward investments in Asia, Europe, and the Americas.” data-reactid=”19″>The continent minted its first $1bn unicorn—e-commerce venture Jumia—in 2016.  And at least one big technology company in Africa, Naspers, regularly makes outward investments in Asia, Europe, and the Americas.

Facebook, Google, and Netflix, has expanded in Africa. IBM built a $100 million research initiative based in Kenya to create an African version of Watson, dubbed Lucy. Uber operates in eight African countries and is testing product options on the continent that could end up in its cars in London, New York, or DC.” data-reactid=”20″>Over the last five years, just about every big name U.S. tech company, including FacebookGoogle, and Netflix, has expanded in Africa. IBM built a $100 million research initiative based in Kenya to create an African version of Watson, dubbed Lucy. Uber operates in eight African countries and is testing product options on the continent that could end up in its cars in London, New York, or DC.

BRCK Wi-Fi device, developed in Kenya, helps connect people in internet deadspots on five continents. The Andela coding accelerator is shaping African programmers who work for global Fortune 500 companies.” data-reactid=”28″>Africa is now exporting technology and innovation that has the potential to impact the U.S. The solar powered BRCK Wi-Fi device, developed in Kenya, helps connect people in internet deadspots on five continents. The Andela coding accelerator is shaping African programmers who work for global Fortune 500 companies.

mobile payments solutions in Kenya and Nigeria are used as digital finance case studies by big banks across the world. In 2016, Africa incubated the first national drone delivery program at scale through a partnership with American robotics startup Zipline and the government of Rwanda, which has been studied by the FAA for application in the U.S.” data-reactid=”36″>African mobile payments solutions in Kenya and Nigeria are used as digital finance case studies by big banks across the world. In 2016, Africa incubated the first national drone delivery program at scale through a partnership with American robotics startup Zipline and the government of Rwanda, which has been studied by the FAA for application in the U.S.

And behind all this technological innovation is a new generation of African tech enthusiast and entrepreneurs. Many of them have stronger ties to the U.S. than any other region in the world.

Konga (Sim Shagaya) went to Harvard Business School and worked in the U.S.” data-reactid=”40″>The original founders of the continent’s big e-commerce startups, Jumia (Tunde Kehinde and Raphael Afaedor) and Konga (Sim Shagaya) went to Harvard Business School and worked in the U.S.

BRCK co-founder Juliana Rotich

Paga, studied at Stanford and worked at Cisco before launching his digital payments company in Lagos.” data-reactid=”52″>BRCK co-founder Juliana Rotich is a University of Missouri grad and MIT Fellow. Nigerian fintech entrepreneur, Tayo Oviosu, founder of fintech firm Paga, studied at Stanford and worked at Cisco before launching his digital payments company in Lagos.

And Nigerian immigrant Chris Folayan—founder of e-commerce venture MallforAfrica—is using his platform to boost U.S. exports in Africa and profits for American companies.

MallforAfrica’s eBay collaboration, American individuals and small businesses are generating revenue in the U.S. through online sales in Africa.” data-reactid=”54″>With its proprietary payment and delivery system, the site allows partners such as Macy’s, BestBuy, and Auto Parts Warehouse to sell in Africa. Through, MallforAfrica’s eBay collaboration, American individuals and small businesses are generating revenue in the U.S. through online sales in Africa.

employing Americans at its Portland processing center. It plans to expand with a new U.S. location in 2018.” data-reactid=”55″>And MallforAfrica—a tech startup founded by an African immigrant—is now employing Americans at its Portland processing center. It plans to expand with a new U.S. location in 2018.

So circling back to Shithole gate, when it comes to Africa and African immigrants, there’s a lot more for the president and his administration to consider when it comes to policy and characterizations of the continent. Africa’s technology sector, IT entrepreneurs, and their growing connections to the United States should factor highly.


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Artificial intelligence proves major time savings for federal employees | NETWORKFIGHTS.COM

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The phrase “artificial intelligence” can stir up a lot of panic at some federal agencies, and can give rise to the idea of intelligent machines putting some employees out of work.

However, some federal agencies are embracing the idea of artificial intelligence, and in those test cases, adopting machine learning comes down to a few key strategies like starting small and managing expectations.

While AI isn’t a panacea for every big-data problem in government, agency leaders say they see value in using machine learning to handle the most tedious aspects of handling data, which frees up human operators to address more mission-critical issues.

“Artificial intelligence is an imperative. It’s not something that’s nice to have, or something that we should consider at some point,” Teresa Smetzer, the director of digital futures at the Central Intelligence Agency said Tuesday during an event sponsored by Partnership for Public Service and the IBM Center for the Business of Government. “We have an enormous exponential growth in the amount of data, the variety of data, the velocity of data, and our nation’s security really depends on our ability to quickly understand what data we have, what it means and how we’re going to use it.”

While still in its early stages, artificial intelligence has received lots of buy-in from the private sector and the academic world. But Rep. Pete Olson (R-Texas), a co-founder of the Artificial Intelligence Caucus on Capitol Hill, said the conversation around AI has not yet addressed the implications for lawmakers and the federal government.

“AI has the ability to provide lawmakers like me with up-to-date information, leading to better-informed decisions. And since AI never, ever forgets, its constant review of the effectiveness of policy gives lawmakers and government officials the opportunity to be proactive and address issues as they first crop up, and not wait to deal with them years and years later, when the problems get much, much, much bigger,” Olson said.

The key to going forward with new developments with AI, Olson said, includes protecting the privacy of individuals’ personal information in databases and educating the workforce to view artificial intelligence as a tool, and not as a competitor.

Mallory Barg Bulman, the vice president of research and evaluation at the Partnership for Public Service, said the rise of AI comes at a time when agencies face new technology-driven challenges, but haven’t received new funds or manpower to address them.

“We’re at a time in government where we’re not able to do more, with more,” Bulman said. “We’re really trying to look for that Option C. What is that other option? What is the way to do things differently to achieve critical outcomes?”

National security implication for AI

From a national security perspective, Smetzer said the CIA’s goal is to reach a stage where the intelligence community doesn’t just react to events, but also anticipates them. But to get there, the agency first has to make sense of the troves of incoming data it receives around the clock.

As the director of digital futures, Smetzer works closely with the private sector and universities to learn more about the cutting-edge uses of machine learning.

“We’re trying to leverage really the investment, which has grown three or four times over the last few years,” she said.

While artificial intelligence has proven value in a number of case studies, Claude Yusti, a federal cognitive solutions leader at IBM, cautioned viewing machine learning as the end-all-be-all solution for federal IT.

“No one sets out to do AI projects. That’s not the ambition,” Yusti said. “The ambition is, people have problems to solve, and a lot of times they’ve been stymied in terms of how far they can get with a solution. And the question is, what is the difference that AI brings to the equation that makes problems go away better, more effectively?”

In the case of the CIA, selling AI as the solution to technology challenges has meant taking an incremental approach.

“Start small with incubation, do proofs of concept, evaluate multiple technologies [and] multiple approaches. Learn from that and then expand on that. That’s the approach we’ve taken,” Smetzer said. “We have the advantage that we made a strategic investment four or five years ago into a cloud computing environment … but we still have a lot of work to do when it comes to the data and the expertise, and really solving our mission-use cases and problems.”

Al holds potential to reduce tedious tasks

While AI does have national security implications, it can also be used by civilian federal agencies to reduce workers’ time on more tedious tasks. That has largely been the story at the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which used AI to compile data on workplace injuries.

For years, BLS employees have had to manually sort incoming descriptions of each injury case,  including the names of occupations and industries.

“But as you can imagine, there’s millions of these data points, and so to figure out how to classify them was typically a human process that took a lot of time,” said William Wiatrowski, the acting BLS commissioner.

In one year alone, BLS saw more than 2,000 different job titles for a position that could generally be described as a janitor or cleaner. While making sense of all those titles would be a tedious task for a BLS employee, AI has reduced that burden on the bureau’s workers.

“Traditionally, we would have staff that would review that data by hand, and would determine that they belonged in Occupation Code X, which is the janitor and cleaner. That’s something that we can now use machine learning to improve the consistency,” Wiatrowski said.

In order to build momentum for machine learning at federal workplaces, Richard Ikeda, the director of the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Research Information Systems, agreed that the theme of starting small is the way to go.

“At NIH, there’s the enterprise-level IT systems, which would be an expensive place to basically integrate an AI system. But you can start with the institutes and centers themselves, where they have an issue that they need to tackle that takes a lot of time. And they have a little more flexibility than the enterprise does, and they can experiment and start small with a problem, and then finding out if it’s successful or not and move it to the enterprise,” he said.


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Artificial intelligence proves major time savings for federal employees | NEURALSCULPT

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The phrase “artificial intelligence” can stir up a lot of panic at some federal agencies, and can give rise to the idea of intelligent machines putting some employees out of work.

However, some federal agencies are embracing the idea of artificial intelligence, and in those test cases, adopting machine learning comes down to a few key strategies like starting small and managing expectations.

While AI isn’t a panacea for every big-data problem in government, agency leaders say they see value in using machine learning to handle the most tedious aspects of handling data, which frees up human operators to address more mission-critical issues.

“Artificial intelligence is an imperative. It’s not something that’s nice to have, or something that we should consider at some point,” Teresa Smetzer, the director of digital futures at the Central Intelligence Agency said Tuesday during an event sponsored by Partnership for Public Service and the IBM Center for the Business of Government. “We have an enormous exponential growth in the amount of data, the variety of data, the velocity of data, and our nation’s security really depends on our ability to quickly understand what data we have, what it means and how we’re going to use it.”

While still in its early stages, artificial intelligence has received lots of buy-in from the private sector and the academic world. But Rep. Pete Olson (R-Texas), a co-founder of the Artificial Intelligence Caucus on Capitol Hill, said the conversation around AI has not yet addressed the implications for lawmakers and the federal government.

“AI has the ability to provide lawmakers like me with up-to-date information, leading to better-informed decisions. And since AI never, ever forgets, its constant review of the effectiveness of policy gives lawmakers and government officials the opportunity to be proactive and address issues as they first crop up, and not wait to deal with them years and years later, when the problems get much, much, much bigger,” Olson said.

The key to going forward with new developments with AI, Olson said, includes protecting the privacy of individuals’ personal information in databases and educating the workforce to view artificial intelligence as a tool, and not as a competitor.

Mallory Barg Bulman, the vice president of research and evaluation at the Partnership for Public Service, said the rise of AI comes at a time when agencies face new technology-driven challenges, but haven’t received new funds or manpower to address them.

“We’re at a time in government where we’re not able to do more, with more,” Bulman said. “We’re really trying to look for that Option C. What is that other option? What is the way to do things differently to achieve critical outcomes?”

National security implication for AI

From a national security perspective, Smetzer said the CIA’s goal is to reach a stage where the intelligence community doesn’t just react to events, but also anticipates them. But to get there, the agency first has to make sense of the troves of incoming data it receives around the clock.

As the director of digital futures, Smetzer works closely with the private sector and universities to learn more about the cutting-edge uses of machine learning.

“We’re trying to leverage really the investment, which has grown three or four times over the last few years,” she said.

While artificial intelligence has proven value in a number of case studies, Claude Yusti, a federal cognitive solutions leader at IBM, cautioned viewing machine learning as the end-all-be-all solution for federal IT.

“No one sets out to do AI projects. That’s not the ambition,” Yusti said. “The ambition is, people have problems to solve, and a lot of times they’ve been stymied in terms of how far they can get with a solution. And the question is, what is the difference that AI brings to the equation that makes problems go away better, more effectively?”

In the case of the CIA, selling AI as the solution to technology challenges has meant taking an incremental approach.

“Start small with incubation, do proofs of concept, evaluate multiple technologies [and] multiple approaches. Learn from that and then expand on that. That’s the approach we’ve taken,” Smetzer said. “We have the advantage that we made a strategic investment four or five years ago into a cloud computing environment … but we still have a lot of work to do when it comes to the data and the expertise, and really solving our mission-use cases and problems.”

Al holds potential to reduce tedious tasks

While AI does have national security implications, it can also be used by civilian federal agencies to reduce workers’ time on more tedious tasks. That has largely been the story at the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which used AI to compile data on workplace injuries.

For years, BLS employees have had to manually sort incoming descriptions of each injury case,  including the names of occupations and industries.

“But as you can imagine, there’s millions of these data points, and so to figure out how to classify them was typically a human process that took a lot of time,” said William Wiatrowski, the acting BLS commissioner.

In one year alone, BLS saw more than 2,000 different job titles for a position that could generally be described as a janitor or cleaner. While making sense of all those titles would be a tedious task for a BLS employee, AI has reduced that burden on the bureau’s workers.

“Traditionally, we would have staff that would review that data by hand, and would determine that they belonged in Occupation Code X, which is the janitor and cleaner. That’s something that we can now use machine learning to improve the consistency,” Wiatrowski said.

In order to build momentum for machine learning at federal workplaces, Richard Ikeda, the director of the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Research Information Systems, agreed that the theme of starting small is the way to go.

“At NIH, there’s the enterprise-level IT systems, which would be an expensive place to basically integrate an AI system. But you can start with the institutes and centers themselves, where they have an issue that they need to tackle that takes a lot of time. And they have a little more flexibility than the enterprise does, and they can experiment and start small with a problem, and then finding out if it’s successful or not and move it to the enterprise,” he said.


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