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The Olympics on The E.R.: What Can We Learn From Past Games Ahead of Pyeongchang?

In part one of our two-part Olympics series, print editor Sarah Wildman calls up two historians to ask what we can learn from past games ahead of the kick off in South Korea on February 9. VISIT THE SOURCE ARTICLE Author: Shelbie Bostedt

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Fox Exposes the Clintons in the Scandalous Series | CENSORED.TODAY

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The excellent 7-part Fox News documentary series Scandalous, covering the scandals of the Clintons through the 42nd president’s impeachment trial in 1999, continues tonight with the premiere of part 2, “A Woman Called Paula.” The hour-long program airs at 8 P.M. E.T./P.T. At 7 P.M., part 1, “Up Crooked Creek” about the Whitewater scandal, which originally aired last Sunday, will be reprised.

Fox hopes that Scandalous will be an ongoing series devoted to various political scandals in American history. The first 7 parts, devoted to the Clintons, total 280 minutes of content and go a long way towards helping to correct the largely sanitized and whitewashed record of Bill Clinton’s scandal-ridden career and presidency. Since he left office on January 20, 2001, the mainstream media, to my knowledge, has never attempted any serious appraisals of the underside of Bill and Hillary Clinton’s eight years in the White House and their earlier careers in Arkansas. The only exception was the PBS American Experience 2-part, 4-hour presidents’ series episode about Clinton which aired most recently in 2012. It covered Bill and Hillary’s entire career with only a minor focus on the scandals. Like most MSM appraisals of the Clintons, it reinforced the gauzy, airbrushed history of the 1990s, which witnessed the pumped up Internet dot com surge that helped to propel the temporary economic boomlet before the bubble started to burst in 2000, Bill Clinton’s last full year in office.

The universally positive mainstream media appraisals of Bill Clinton’s tenure as president — his 1999 impeachment trial notwithstanding — helped him to achieve a 66% approval rating when he left office in 2001 and strong approval ratings in subsequent years (until recently) as an ex-president.

Scandalous is off to a good start. Part 1 aired twice last Sunday and earned very strong ratings, with the show beating its competition on CNN and MSNBC in the Nielsen ratings by a wide margin in both total viewers (40+% more viewers than CNN and MSNBC combined in the 8 P.M. hour) and the age 25-54 demographic. CNN has also had good ratings luck with its documentaries in recent years, including multi-part series devoted to the decades of the 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s. In my opinion, Fox News’ efforts with Scandalous represent a more serious and balanced appraisal of its subject than CNN’s hagiographic and one-sided take on recent decades, especially their excesses. (In reviewing CNN’s “The Nineties,” Salon — usually a friend of CNN — opined that the series was “empty nostalgia for a decade we should let die.”)

Part 2 of Scandalous, “A Woman Called Paula,” focuses on the Paula Jones affair, which was investigated by the Special Prosecutor appointed to look into the Clintons’ involvement in the corrupt Whitewater, Arkansas land deal while Bill Clinton was the governor of Arkansas. According to an article about the episode at Fox News’ Web site, “A Woman Called Paula”

follows Jones’ sexual harassment lawsuit against former President Bill Clinton and the high-stakes political drama that ensued.

Jones alleged that then-Arkansas Gov. Clinton propositioned her and exposed himself at a conference in Little Rock in 1991. He denied the allegation.

“She was a woman that really just wanted to have her good name cleared. All she wanted was an apology,” said Joseph Cammarata, who represented Jones.

When that didn’t happen, they filed a lawsuit, eventually reaching a $850,000 settlement with Clinton in 1999.

Although its critics on the left insist that Fox News, which they often refer to as “Faux News,” is anything but “fair and balanced” (its original motto), recent studies have concluded that its news coverage is in fact the most objective of the mainstream cable/satellite and broadcast media. Harvard University’s Shorenstein Center, for example, in its analysis of media reporting on  President Trump’s first 100 days, found that the broadcast networks and cable television news channels’ coverage of Trump was 90+% negative. The sole exception was Fox News, whose reporting on President Trump was slightly more negative than positive (52 to 48%) and was therefore the closest of all media studied to being balanced.

Part 1 of Scandalous represented a serious effort to reconstruct past events, using archival video clips interspersed with new interviews with many of the principals in the story, some of them speaking on camera and on the record for the first time. Hopefully, the strong ratings so far for the series, like CNN’s success with its multi-part documentaries, will breathe new life into television documentaries which in the past were a mainstay of the broadcast networks but have all but disappeared in recent years, except for PBS.

Peter Barry Chowka is a veteran reporter and analyst of news on national politics, media, and popular culture.  In addition to his writing, Peter has appeared as a guest commentator on NBC; PBS; the CBC; and, on January 4, 2018, the BBC.  For announcements and links to a wide selection of Peter’s published work, follow him on Twitter at @pchowka.

The excellent 7-part Fox News documentary series Scandalous, covering the scandals of the Clintons through the 42nd president’s impeachment trial in 1999, continues tonight with the premiere of part 2, “A Woman Called Paula.” The hour-long program airs at 8 P.M. E.T./P.T. At 7 P.M., part 1, “Up Crooked Creek” about the Whitewater scandal, which originally aired last Sunday, will be reprised.

Fox hopes that Scandalous will be an ongoing series devoted to various political scandals in American history. The first 7 parts, devoted to the Clintons, total 280 minutes of content and go a long way towards helping to correct the largely sanitized and whitewashed record of Bill Clinton’s scandal-ridden career and presidency. Since he left office on January 20, 2001, the mainstream media, to my knowledge, has never attempted any serious appraisals of the underside of Bill and Hillary Clinton’s eight years in the White House and their earlier careers in Arkansas. The only exception was the PBS American Experience 2-part, 4-hour presidents’ series episode about Clinton which aired most recently in 2012. It covered Bill and Hillary’s entire career with only a minor focus on the scandals. Like most MSM appraisals of the Clintons, it reinforced the gauzy, airbrushed history of the 1990s, which witnessed the pumped up Internet dot com surge that helped to propel the temporary economic boomlet before the bubble started to burst in 2000, Bill Clinton’s last full year in office.

The universally positive mainstream media appraisals of Bill Clinton’s tenure as president — his 1999 impeachment trial notwithstanding — helped him to achieve a 66% approval rating when he left office in 2001 and strong approval ratings in subsequent years (until recently) as an ex-president.

Scandalous is off to a good start. Part 1 aired twice last Sunday and earned very strong ratings, with the show beating its competition on CNN and MSNBC in the Nielsen ratings by a wide margin in both total viewers (40+% more viewers than CNN and MSNBC combined in the 8 P.M. hour) and the age 25-54 demographic. CNN has also had good ratings luck with its documentaries in recent years, including multi-part series devoted to the decades of the 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s. In my opinion, Fox News’ efforts with Scandalous represent a more serious and balanced appraisal of its subject than CNN’s hagiographic and one-sided take on recent decades, especially their excesses. (In reviewing CNN’s “The Nineties,” Salon — usually a friend of CNN — opined that the series was “empty nostalgia for a decade we should let die.”)

Part 2 of Scandalous, “A Woman Called Paula,” focuses on the Paula Jones affair, which was investigated by the Special Prosecutor appointed to look into the Clintons’ involvement in the corrupt Whitewater, Arkansas land deal while Bill Clinton was the governor of Arkansas. According to an article about the episode at Fox News’ Web site, “A Woman Called Paula”

follows Jones’ sexual harassment lawsuit against former President Bill Clinton and the high-stakes political drama that ensued.

Jones alleged that then-Arkansas Gov. Clinton propositioned her and exposed himself at a conference in Little Rock in 1991. He denied the allegation.

“She was a woman that really just wanted to have her good name cleared. All she wanted was an apology,” said Joseph Cammarata, who represented Jones.

When that didn’t happen, they filed a lawsuit, eventually reaching a $850,000 settlement with Clinton in 1999.

Although its critics on the left insist that Fox News, which they often refer to as “Faux News,” is anything but “fair and balanced” (its original motto), recent studies have concluded that its news coverage is in fact the most objective of the mainstream cable/satellite and broadcast media. Harvard University’s Shorenstein Center, for example, in its analysis of media reporting on  President Trump’s first 100 days, found that the broadcast networks and cable television news channels’ coverage of Trump was 90+% negative. The sole exception was Fox News, whose reporting on President Trump was slightly more negative than positive (52 to 48%) and was therefore the closest of all media studied to being balanced.

Part 1 of Scandalous represented a serious effort to reconstruct past events, using archival video clips interspersed with new interviews with many of the principals in the story, some of them speaking on camera and on the record for the first time. Hopefully, the strong ratings so far for the series, like CNN’s success with its multi-part documentaries, will breathe new life into television documentaries which in the past were a mainstay of the broadcast networks but have all but disappeared in recent years, except for PBS.

Peter Barry Chowka is a veteran reporter and analyst of news on national politics, media, and popular culture.  In addition to his writing, Peter has appeared as a guest commentator on NBC; PBS; the CBC; and, on January 4, 2018, the BBC.  For announcements and links to a wide selection of Peter’s published work, follow him on Twitter at @pchowka.


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Is artificial intelligence killing Japan’s banks? | The Japan Times | NEURALSCULPT

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As part of an ongoing series about artificial intelligence, the Asahi Shimbun on Jan. 11 published a story that asserts the financial industry has adopted AI more readily than any other. Because finance is a data-driven endeavor, designing AI software to do things such as read and analyze reams of economic information and project future investment performance is progressing rapidly. Moreover, voice recognition is becoming so advanced that standing clients and potential customers will no longer have to talk to humans about their financial needs. Even if a person is going to make the final decision about a transaction, most of the work has already been done.

This development, however, may also hasten the end of banks. Due to Japan’s zero interest rate policy, domestic banks can’t make money on loans, so they’ve become clearinghouses for other financial companies’ products, be it mutual funds or insurance policies. Banks are basically salesmen who collect handling fees for delivering products and services. Once that task is automated or otherwise rendered obsolete by new technology, what’s the point of a bank?

These types of stories have been receiving a great deal of attention in the media for a while now, and Asahi’s affiliate weekly magazine, Aera, devoted a large portion of its Jan. 22 issue specifically to the end of banking in Japan. The articles seem to be a response to announcements made in recent months by the three Japanese “megabanks” that they would be eliminating a large number of jobs over the next decade: 19,000 at Mizuho Financial Group, 9,500 at Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group and 4,000 at Sumitomo Mitsui Financial Group.

The title of the lead Aera feature, “Seven more years for banks,” makes it clear. The article opens with a scene that took place at a Mizuho branch on Oct. 28. Alarmed by media coverage of the staff cuts, employees confronted a manager, who said that the reductions would be carried out through “natural attrition,” meaning scheduled retirement and dwindling university recruitment targets. It didn’t mean that any existing employees would be laid off.

However, elsewhere in the article, as well as in other articles in the issue, Aera explains that banks are anachronisms. The idea of a bank, which operates by paying interest to people who save their money there and then lends that money to others who pay the bank a higher interest rate, doesn’t apply any more. People will still need to borrow money, but the mechanics of financing is changing. The government has tried to postpone the end of banking by allowing more mergers, but there’s nothing left to merge. Banks still boast respectable profits, but that’s because they take advantage of Japan’s and others’ relatively robust economies and invest customers’ savings in stocks and bonds. They don’t need a lot of people to do that.

Bankers who joined their companies during the bubble period in the late 1980s are feeling the most anxious, since they are due for retirement in the next decade or so. In its lead article, Aera cites a questionnaire given out by one bank to management level employees that provides three future job options: remaining at the bank where they are currently employed, transferring to an affiliate company or transferring to a client company of the bank. This last option is a custom peculiar to Japan: When there are no higher-level openings for a senior manager, the company will pressure a client to hire the manager for a dead-end job. In any case, there will be even fewer management slots in the future within banking companies.

Younger bank employees may be better off looking for new jobs now while they’re at an age where they can still work their way up in another firm, but as one article points out, despite the high salary and perks that often come with a job in banking, more and more bankers are realizing that there is no guarantee that they will end up in the “elite course” management position they were led to expect. Even worse, they don’t feel they have any control over their future.

Aera contends that bank jobs are still coveted by university students. More than 600 graduates of the University of Tokyo, the most prestigious school in Japan, have been recruited by megabanks over the past 10 years. The magazine finds this puzzling, since banks lost their luster after the asset bubble burst in the early ’90s. Smaller, regional banks either went bankrupt or were absorbed by larger firms. Then in 1998, the government had to inject money into the banking sector to keep it solvent. Banking gradually became a seedy enterprise in the public imagination, with employees chasing after more deposits and figuring out ways to increase interest rates on existing loans. And, despite the enormous popularity of the 2013 TV series “Hanzawa Naoki,” which dramatized the intrigues of Japanese banking during the postwar economic miracle, bank employees are no longer considered great catches at gōkon, the organized group dates in which men and women get together for purposes of possible future matrimony.

One recruitment consultant told Aera that banks remain popular among students for reasons that have nothing to do with what they want from life. Students from prestigious schools have been “winners” their whole lives, and banks are thought of as the most discriminating employers, so they appreciate the challenge of trying to be hired by a bank even if they aren’t particularly keen to work for one. It’s about inertia, not ambition. And since banks are all the same, they try to recruit students from top schools in order to add distinction to their respective workforces.

In the Dec. 20 edition of Diamond Online, economics critic Hajime Yamazaki wrote that he always tries to dissuade young people from working for banks. The salaries may still be high, but so is the risk of being laid off and the chance of upward mobility is getting slimmer all the time.

Bluntly put, Yamazaki says banks hire excellent people and then squander their potential. It’s just as well they’re disappearing.


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Podcast: Education for the Fourth Industrial Revolution | WARFAREWEB.COM

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This is episode 4 in a 10-part podcast series that will introduce listeners to the thinkers, entrepreneurs, and innovators who are already spotting the risks ahead, and seeking to guide humanity towards the land of ease and plenty that some believe is now within reach.

Episode 4 – Education for the Fourth Industrial Revolution

New episodes will be published every Tuesday from January 23, 2018 through March 6 on iTunes, Spotify and SoundCloud.

How do you educate children for a future whose main characteristic is ambiguous change? How will new technologies impact what we need to learn, as well as how we do it?

The First Industrial Revolution saw a proliferation of new educational models as society evolved its accommodation with new technologies and the new economy they produced. It is reasonable to expect something similar this time around, with a whole generation of reformers and ed tech entrepreneurs already experimenting with new learning tools and new educational priorities. Is knowledge redundant in an age of constant internet access?

Can AI create personal tutors for all? Can entrepreneurialism and independence join maths and science as curriculum fundamentals?

In episode four of ‘Shaping the Fourth Industrial Revolution’ we meet Ted Dintersmith, the former venture capitalist turned education philanthropist and activist; Sugata Mitra, Professor of Educational Technology and winner of the TED prize; Pasi Sahlberg, Finnish education guru and author; Brittany Bir, the CEO of programming school 42 Silicon Valley; Sylvain Kalache, co-founder of Holberton School of Software Engineering; Farb Nivi, founder of Grockit and Learnist; and deep learning expert, Jeremy Howard.

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Author: Anne Marie Engtoft Larsen || World Economic Forum

Cisco IP Conference Phone 7832, Affordable VoIP for Small Conference Rooms | NETWORKFIGHTS.COM

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The IP Conference Phone 7832, new to the IP Phone 7800 Series, is the introduction of an audio conference phone which is ideal for your small conference/huddle rooms and private office desks.

Two color options (charcoal and white)

The new IP Conference Phone 7832 meets the needs of rooms up to 172 sq. feet (16 sq. meters) or up to 6 participants.

The 7832 features a sleek, contemporary design with delivery of powerful audio performance. It offers 360-degree hands-free VoIP communications with a microphone pickup range of 7ft (213 cm).

Users with 7800 Series phones will find the experience easy-to-use, as menus and navigation are common with the series’ desk phones. In turn, administratively it shares the same phone software as the 7800 Series desk phone models, reducing project management and user training costs for corporate IT.

The 7832 supports Cisco EnergyWise for reduced power consumption in-off work hours. It is an IEEE Power over Ethernet Class 2 endpoint.

The 7832 is deployable in the cloud with Cisco Spark and as of CYQ3 2017, will also support mid-size to large enterprises on-premises.

It is also available in support of Cisco approved UCaaS partner offers as a multiplatform phone.

Primary user features include:
  • 360-degree room coverage for spaces up to 172 square feet (16 square meters)
  • Microphone pickup up to 7 feet (213 centimeters) from the endpoint
  • Generous mute button to aid access from all sides of the endpoint
  • Raised edge to ease handling and repositioning at the table or desk
  • 3.4-inch (8.6-cm) backlit, monochrome, pixel-based display with an antiglare bezel to make viewing and interaction easier
Main administration features include:
  • 10/100 Power over Ethernet (Class 2), requiring no standalone power supply
  • Common firmware with other 7800 Series endpoints to simplify device management
  • Flexible deployment options include on-premises, hosted, and Cisco Spark cloud
  • Charcoal and white color options to fit your work environment
  • Enhanced security with Secure Hash Algorithm 2 (SHA-2) support
Cisco IP Conference Phone 7832-Specifications at a Glance
Room size Small conference rooms, executive desks; spaces up to 172 square feet/16 square meters in size
Display 3.4-in., 384 x 128 backlit pixel monochrome LCD with anti-glare bezel
Network Port 10/100
Programmable soft keys 4
Full-duplex speakerphone Yes
Wideband audio Yes (G.722)
Security SHA-2, 802.1x, TLS 1.2, SRTP, AES-256K
Power over Ethernet (PoE) class Yes (Class 2)

Licensing-The Cisco IP Phone 7832 requires an Enhanced User Connect License (UCL) in order to connect to Cisco Unified Communications Manager.

Cisco IP Conference Phone 7832 Buttons and Features

 Ordering Information
Product Number Description
CP-7832-K9= ●  Cisco IP Conference Phone 7832, Cisco Smoke
CP-7832-W-K9= ●  Cisco IP Conference Phone 7832, Cisco White
CP-7832-PWR-SPL= ●  POE power cable to work with Power Cube 3 for POE incapable LAN switches
CP-PWR-CUBE-3= ●  Cisco Power Cube 3 to work with POE power cable for wall power.
CP-PWR-CORD-AP= ●  Power Cord Asia Pacific
CP-PWR-CORD-AR= ●  Power Cord Argentina
CP-PWR-CORD-AU= ●  Power Cord Australia
CP-PWR-CORD-BZ= ●  Power Cord Brazil
CP-PWR-CORD-CE= ●  Power Cord Europe
CP-PWR-CORD-CN= ●  Power Cord China
CP-PWR-CORD-JP= ●  Power Cord Japan
CP-PWR-CORD-NA= ●  Power Cord North America
CP-PWR-CORD-SW= ●  Power Cord Switzerland
CP-PWR-CORD-UK= ●  Power Cord United Kingdom

The Full PDF File: Cisco IP Conference Phone 7832 Data Sheet

Compare Cisco IP Phone 7800 Models

Get the Best Price on Cisco IP Phone 7800 Series

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Cisco IP Phone 7800 and 8800 Series-Security Features for Today

Cisco IP Phone 7861 vs. Cisco IP Phone 7841 vs. Cisco IP Phone 7821

More Cisco IP Phone Topics: http://blog.router-switch.com/category/reviews/cisco-ip-phones-voip/


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Author: Yejian Technologies || Router Switch Blog

The Banner Saga 3 release has been brought forward – VideoGamer.com

The Banner Saga 3, the next chapter in Stoic Games’ Viking-’em-up adventure series, will launch on PC in Summer 2018, the developer has announced. This puts the sequel out far earlier than its original December release window. Launched on Kickstarter last year, The Banner Saga 3 quickly barrelled past its $200,000 stretch goal, notching up over $400,000 in funds. Development seems to…

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New Dragon Age game now all but confirmed by BioWare producer – VideoGamer.com

The next chapter in the Dragon Age franchise is currently in development at BioWare, the series’ executive producer has revealed on Twitter. The news comes hot on the heels of reports that the developer’s next major project, Anthem, has been shoved out of 2018 and into next year. Dragon Age 4 (or whatever it ends up being called; BioWare has shown a fondness for subtitles lately) has…

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CD Projekt’s Fight for Survival | VIDEOGAME.GUIDE

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CD Projekt Red, the guys behind the Witcher series and the upcoming Cyberpunk 2077, place a lot of stock in being independent. They take pride in it. It’s part of their business model. But how did they get to be in such a strong place in the super-competitive games industry, where AAA publishers rule the roost, without giving up their independence? Well. By fighting. A lot.

Hosts: Mike Williams and Gareth Evans
Editor: Liam McKelvey
Script: Liam McKelvey

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PCGamesN – https://www.pcgamesn.com/how-cd-projekt-red-fought-publishers-win-their-independence

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LEGENDARY RESTRICTIONS! NO STAMINA BREAKS, GUARDS, OR SUPER ATTACKS! | Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2 – YouTube | DRAGONBALL.TODAY

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LEGENDARY RESTRICTIONS! NO STAMINA BREAKS, GUARDS, OR SUPER ATTACKS! | Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2

Legendary Restrictions will be a potential Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2 series where based on what the randomizer says, we’ll fight without things like Stamina Break, Guard, etc.
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