Posts

FRANCESCHI: Artificial Intelligence will be the next revolution. | NEURALSCULPT

Spread the love

By LUIS FRANCESCHI
More by this Author

Last week, Melinda Gates and Strive Masiyiwa spoke in Nairobi about their latest initiative, the Pathways for Prosperity Commission on Technology and Inclusive Development.

These top billionaires aim to bring together “diverse voices and perspectives to map the potential impacts of technology on jobs in developing countries and come up with practical proposals.”

On Friday, January 26, Masiyiwa toured the Strathmore campus. As our conversation got more and more engaging, we came to the Policy Innovation Centre, a high-tech arbitration room sponsored by Microsoft, where exciting arbitrations, policy discussions and law drafting is taking place.

STRIVING FOR CHANGE

In that room, Masiyiwa had a short conversation with my colleague deans of law schools of Kenyan universities. Every law school was represented. The deans of the University of Nairobi, Kenyatta University, JKUAT, Mount Kenya, CUEA, Kisii, Nazarene and Daystar were present. Riara, Egerton and Kabarak were not in attendance but they had sent their comments beforehand.

We had all been discussing partnerships, collaboration, internationalisation as well as exchanging ideas and suggestions that could help enrich and improve the Fred Ojiambo report on legal education status and reforms.

As we walked out of the room, towards the Pathways for Prosperity event, Masiyiwa remarked that untold changes will happen in law with the advent of Artificial Intelligence. He added, “If we thought that the mobile phone and the internet were great inventions, just you wait to witness Artificial Intelligence, AI”.

In today’s world, innovation is no longer close at hand, but in your very hands. From your own office, couch, kitchen, kiosk or matatu, you have got the power to change the way the world functions.

THE CHALLENGE OF CHANGE

Change brings unexpected challenges. Law, ethics and morality cannot be the ones holding change back. On the contrary, they must be tools for sustainable change.

Not every change is good. Ethics analyses change through moral lenses, and calls on law to direct that change towards the common good of humanity.

Law points the direction to follow, and the courts ensure we keep that course. Part of the great challenge of today’s justice system is that the world has changed, but courts have not. In this regard, we lawyers are guilty as charged, for we hang on to this old outdated court system just like traditional taxi drivers fought the unavoidable change Uber brought to our lives.

OLD COURTS MUST CHANGE

Courts, as we know them today, must disappear. We cannot continue having the same systems, procedures and papers we used to have a thousand years ago.

I dream of the courts of the future, where cases could be resolved within a few weeks or even days. Judges, advocates and witnesses could work and present documents and evidence through virtual systems, for registries will be in the Cloud. All direct contact that encourages corruption would be restricted and properly audited.

I dream with the end of papers, dusty registries, personal appearances, cash transactions and language barriers. Microsoft, Google and Apple are competing to create simultaneous translation systems via Skype, Hangout and Facetime.

This dream is close at hand; it is not impossible, and it is already happening at the Dispute Resolution Authority (DRA) in Dubai.

DUBAI’S COURTS OF THE FUTURE

DRA started as a pilot project in 2004. The pilot was so successful and attracted so many investors to Dubai that in 2014, Dubai’s ruler, Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, harmonised the laws to bring these courts fully into the judicial system.

DRA delivers justice to investors in the Middle East. Its divisions work in partnership to provide businesses with unparalleled choice about how to resolve their commercial disputes, to develop legal talent and to protect individuals investing or living in Dubai.

DRA’s mission statement says, “Together, the divisions of the DRA are helping to support the Dubai Plan 2021, Expo 2020 & UAE Vision 2021 to make the UAE the Preferred Place to Live, Work & Visit.” Microsoft has been a big player in this dream.

We are approaching the world of artificial intelligence (AI). The world is changing; law will change; lawyers must change. Unimaginable and exciting challenges are ahead of us. ‘I see something beautiful on the horizon.’

WHOM DO I RUN OVER?

In a small group discussion with exceedingly clever young future scholars and policymakers, we were conversing about development, law and ethics.

At some point, one of the students, Kimberly Mureithi, a third-year law student who had just won her second moot competition in two months, geared towards a dilemma she learnt from Harvard’s professor Michael Sandel. The “trolley dilemma”.

As Kimberly explained her point, three graduate assistants, Kasyoka Mutunga, Cecil Abungo and Grace Diida, immediately saw the connection between Sandel’s dilemma and AI. We are inventing self-driving cars. There is an expensive award-winning brood mare (a female thoroughbred that is used for breeding) and an old man on the way. A collision is unavoidable…who should be hit?

The mare or the man? What a dilemma. What considerations will the coder take into consideration? Human dignity? Animal rights? Economic gains versus loses? What would be the cheaper option? Who is more financially viable?

VICTIMS OF TODAY’S UNCOMMON SENSE

What is the value of life and why? Whose life matters most? In today’s confused world anything could happen. We have undermined common sense; this will shake and test the limits of our techie future.

Today’s utilitarian world speaks of euthanasia as a sensible way out, elephant poaching as a crime, yet we eat cows, bulls, goats and chickens, and we pay no attention to the ‘pigicidal’ tendencies of bacon lovers.

We do jogging, weight lifting, drink carrot juice and eat healthy…so that we may die healthy. We are in search of a healthy death. A kind of ‘I’m dying but I feel good’ approach.

AI will open a Pandora’s box; we must be prepared. Law must be an agent of change, not an obstacle to progress. Our outdated court system, laws and policies are not fit to face these challenges.

These uncommon problems will only be properly handled through good policies, good laws, and well-thought-out justice systems, founded on common sense for the common good.

Dr Franceschi is the dean of Strathmore Law School. [email protected]; Twitter: @lgfranceschi


VISIT THE SOURCE ARTICLE
Author:


VISIT THE SOURCE ARTICLE
Author: administrator

FRANCESCHI: Artificial Intelligence will be the next revolution. | NETWORKFIGHTS.COM

Spread the love

By LUIS FRANCESCHI
More by this Author

Last week, Melinda Gates and Strive Masiyiwa spoke in Nairobi about their latest initiative, the Pathways for Prosperity Commission on Technology and Inclusive Development.

These top billionaires aim to bring together “diverse voices and perspectives to map the potential impacts of technology on jobs in developing countries and come up with practical proposals.”

On Friday, January 26, Masiyiwa toured the Strathmore campus. As our conversation got more and more engaging, we came to the Policy Innovation Centre, a high-tech arbitration room sponsored by Microsoft, where exciting arbitrations, policy discussions and law drafting is taking place.

STRIVING FOR CHANGE

In that room, Masiyiwa had a short conversation with my colleague deans of law schools of Kenyan universities. Every law school was represented. The deans of the University of Nairobi, Kenyatta University, JKUAT, Mount Kenya, CUEA, Kisii, Nazarene and Daystar were present. Riara, Egerton and Kabarak were not in attendance but they had sent their comments beforehand.

We had all been discussing partnerships, collaboration, internationalisation as well as exchanging ideas and suggestions that could help enrich and improve the Fred Ojiambo report on legal education status and reforms.

As we walked out of the room, towards the Pathways for Prosperity event, Masiyiwa remarked that untold changes will happen in law with the advent of Artificial Intelligence. He added, “If we thought that the mobile phone and the internet were great inventions, just you wait to witness Artificial Intelligence, AI”.

In today’s world, innovation is no longer close at hand, but in your very hands. From your own office, couch, kitchen, kiosk or matatu, you have got the power to change the way the world functions.

THE CHALLENGE OF CHANGE

Change brings unexpected challenges. Law, ethics and morality cannot be the ones holding change back. On the contrary, they must be tools for sustainable change.

Not every change is good. Ethics analyses change through moral lenses, and calls on law to direct that change towards the common good of humanity.

Law points the direction to follow, and the courts ensure we keep that course. Part of the great challenge of today’s justice system is that the world has changed, but courts have not. In this regard, we lawyers are guilty as charged, for we hang on to this old outdated court system just like traditional taxi drivers fought the unavoidable change Uber brought to our lives.

OLD COURTS MUST CHANGE

Courts, as we know them today, must disappear. We cannot continue having the same systems, procedures and papers we used to have a thousand years ago.

I dream of the courts of the future, where cases could be resolved within a few weeks or even days. Judges, advocates and witnesses could work and present documents and evidence through virtual systems, for registries will be in the Cloud. All direct contact that encourages corruption would be restricted and properly audited.

I dream with the end of papers, dusty registries, personal appearances, cash transactions and language barriers. Microsoft, Google and Apple are competing to create simultaneous translation systems via Skype, Hangout and Facetime.

This dream is close at hand; it is not impossible, and it is already happening at the Dispute Resolution Authority (DRA) in Dubai.

DUBAI’S COURTS OF THE FUTURE

DRA started as a pilot project in 2004. The pilot was so successful and attracted so many investors to Dubai that in 2014, Dubai’s ruler, Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, harmonised the laws to bring these courts fully into the judicial system.

DRA delivers justice to investors in the Middle East. Its divisions work in partnership to provide businesses with unparalleled choice about how to resolve their commercial disputes, to develop legal talent and to protect individuals investing or living in Dubai.

DRA’s mission statement says, “Together, the divisions of the DRA are helping to support the Dubai Plan 2021, Expo 2020 & UAE Vision 2021 to make the UAE the Preferred Place to Live, Work & Visit.” Microsoft has been a big player in this dream.

We are approaching the world of artificial intelligence (AI). The world is changing; law will change; lawyers must change. Unimaginable and exciting challenges are ahead of us. ‘I see something beautiful on the horizon.’

WHOM DO I RUN OVER?

In a small group discussion with exceedingly clever young future scholars and policymakers, we were conversing about development, law and ethics.

At some point, one of the students, Kimberly Mureithi, a third-year law student who had just won her second moot competition in two months, geared towards a dilemma she learnt from Harvard’s professor Michael Sandel. The “trolley dilemma”.

As Kimberly explained her point, three graduate assistants, Kasyoka Mutunga, Cecil Abungo and Grace Diida, immediately saw the connection between Sandel’s dilemma and AI. We are inventing self-driving cars. There is an expensive award-winning brood mare (a female thoroughbred that is used for breeding) and an old man on the way. A collision is unavoidable…who should be hit?

The mare or the man? What a dilemma. What considerations will the coder take into consideration? Human dignity? Animal rights? Economic gains versus loses? What would be the cheaper option? Who is more financially viable?

VICTIMS OF TODAY’S UNCOMMON SENSE

What is the value of life and why? Whose life matters most? In today’s confused world anything could happen. We have undermined common sense; this will shake and test the limits of our techie future.

Today’s utilitarian world speaks of euthanasia as a sensible way out, elephant poaching as a crime, yet we eat cows, bulls, goats and chickens, and we pay no attention to the ‘pigicidal’ tendencies of bacon lovers.

We do jogging, weight lifting, drink carrot juice and eat healthy…so that we may die healthy. We are in search of a healthy death. A kind of ‘I’m dying but I feel good’ approach.

AI will open a Pandora’s box; we must be prepared. Law must be an agent of change, not an obstacle to progress. Our outdated court system, laws and policies are not fit to face these challenges.

These uncommon problems will only be properly handled through good policies, good laws, and well-thought-out justice systems, founded on common sense for the common good.

Dr Franceschi is the dean of Strathmore Law School. [email protected]; Twitter: @lgfranceschi



VISIT THE SOURCE ARTICLE

FRANCESCHI: Artificial Intelligence will be the next revolution.


FRANCESCHI: Artificial Intelligence will be the next revolution. | NETWORKFIGHTS.COM

Spread the love

By LUIS FRANCESCHI
More by this Author

Last week, Melinda Gates and Strive Masiyiwa spoke in Nairobi about their latest initiative, the Pathways for Prosperity Commission on Technology and Inclusive Development.

These top billionaires aim to bring together “diverse voices and perspectives to map the potential impacts of technology on jobs in developing countries and come up with practical proposals.”

On Friday, January 26, Masiyiwa toured the Strathmore campus. As our conversation got more and more engaging, we came to the Policy Innovation Centre, a high-tech arbitration room sponsored by Microsoft, where exciting arbitrations, policy discussions and law drafting is taking place.

STRIVING FOR CHANGE

In that room, Masiyiwa had a short conversation with my colleague deans of law schools of Kenyan universities. Every law school was represented. The deans of the University of Nairobi, Kenyatta University, JKUAT, Mount Kenya, CUEA, Kisii, Nazarene and Daystar were present. Riara, Egerton and Kabarak were not in attendance but they had sent their comments beforehand.

We had all been discussing partnerships, collaboration, internationalisation as well as exchanging ideas and suggestions that could help enrich and improve the Fred Ojiambo report on legal education status and reforms.

As we walked out of the room, towards the Pathways for Prosperity event, Masiyiwa remarked that untold changes will happen in law with the advent of Artificial Intelligence. He added, “If we thought that the mobile phone and the internet were great inventions, just you wait to witness Artificial Intelligence, AI”.

In today’s world, innovation is no longer close at hand, but in your very hands. From your own office, couch, kitchen, kiosk or matatu, you have got the power to change the way the world functions.

THE CHALLENGE OF CHANGE

Change brings unexpected challenges. Law, ethics and morality cannot be the ones holding change back. On the contrary, they must be tools for sustainable change.

Not every change is good. Ethics analyses change through moral lenses, and calls on law to direct that change towards the common good of humanity.

Law points the direction to follow, and the courts ensure we keep that course. Part of the great challenge of today’s justice system is that the world has changed, but courts have not. In this regard, we lawyers are guilty as charged, for we hang on to this old outdated court system just like traditional taxi drivers fought the unavoidable change Uber brought to our lives.

OLD COURTS MUST CHANGE

Courts, as we know them today, must disappear. We cannot continue having the same systems, procedures and papers we used to have a thousand years ago.

I dream of the courts of the future, where cases could be resolved within a few weeks or even days. Judges, advocates and witnesses could work and present documents and evidence through virtual systems, for registries will be in the Cloud. All direct contact that encourages corruption would be restricted and properly audited.

I dream with the end of papers, dusty registries, personal appearances, cash transactions and language barriers. Microsoft, Google and Apple are competing to create simultaneous translation systems via Skype, Hangout and Facetime.

This dream is close at hand; it is not impossible, and it is already happening at the Dispute Resolution Authority (DRA) in Dubai.

DUBAI’S COURTS OF THE FUTURE

DRA started as a pilot project in 2004. The pilot was so successful and attracted so many investors to Dubai that in 2014, Dubai’s ruler, Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, harmonised the laws to bring these courts fully into the judicial system.

DRA delivers justice to investors in the Middle East. Its divisions work in partnership to provide businesses with unparalleled choice about how to resolve their commercial disputes, to develop legal talent and to protect individuals investing or living in Dubai.

DRA’s mission statement says, “Together, the divisions of the DRA are helping to support the Dubai Plan 2021, Expo 2020 & UAE Vision 2021 to make the UAE the Preferred Place to Live, Work & Visit.” Microsoft has been a big player in this dream.

We are approaching the world of artificial intelligence (AI). The world is changing; law will change; lawyers must change. Unimaginable and exciting challenges are ahead of us. ‘I see something beautiful on the horizon.’

WHOM DO I RUN OVER?

In a small group discussion with exceedingly clever young future scholars and policymakers, we were conversing about development, law and ethics.

At some point, one of the students, Kimberly Mureithi, a third-year law student who had just won her second moot competition in two months, geared towards a dilemma she learnt from Harvard’s professor Michael Sandel. The “trolley dilemma”.

As Kimberly explained her point, three graduate assistants, Kasyoka Mutunga, Cecil Abungo and Grace Diida, immediately saw the connection between Sandel’s dilemma and AI. We are inventing self-driving cars. There is an expensive award-winning brood mare (a female thoroughbred that is used for breeding) and an old man on the way. A collision is unavoidable…who should be hit?

The mare or the man? What a dilemma. What considerations will the coder take into consideration? Human dignity? Animal rights? Economic gains versus loses? What would be the cheaper option? Who is more financially viable?

VICTIMS OF TODAY’S UNCOMMON SENSE

What is the value of life and why? Whose life matters most? In today’s confused world anything could happen. We have undermined common sense; this will shake and test the limits of our techie future.

Today’s utilitarian world speaks of euthanasia as a sensible way out, elephant poaching as a crime, yet we eat cows, bulls, goats and chickens, and we pay no attention to the ‘pigicidal’ tendencies of bacon lovers.

We do jogging, weight lifting, drink carrot juice and eat healthy…so that we may die healthy. We are in search of a healthy death. A kind of ‘I’m dying but I feel good’ approach.

AI will open a Pandora’s box; we must be prepared. Law must be an agent of change, not an obstacle to progress. Our outdated court system, laws and policies are not fit to face these challenges.

These uncommon problems will only be properly handled through good policies, good laws, and well-thought-out justice systems, founded on common sense for the common good.

Dr Franceschi is the dean of Strathmore Law School. [email protected]; Twitter: @lgfranceschi



VISIT THE SOURCE ARTICLE

FRANCESCHI: Artificial Intelligence will be the next revolution.


FRANCESCHI: Artificial Intelligence will be the next revolution. | NEURALSCULPT

Spread the love

By LUIS FRANCESCHI
More by this Author

Last week, Melinda Gates and Strive Masiyiwa spoke in Nairobi about their latest initiative, the Pathways for Prosperity Commission on Technology and Inclusive Development.

These top billionaires aim to bring together “diverse voices and perspectives to map the potential impacts of technology on jobs in developing countries and come up with practical proposals.”

On Friday, January 26, Masiyiwa toured the Strathmore campus. As our conversation got more and more engaging, we came to the Policy Innovation Centre, a high-tech arbitration room sponsored by Microsoft, where exciting arbitrations, policy discussions and law drafting is taking place.

STRIVING FOR CHANGE

In that room, Masiyiwa had a short conversation with my colleague deans of law schools of Kenyan universities. Every law school was represented. The deans of the University of Nairobi, Kenyatta University, JKUAT, Mount Kenya, CUEA, Kisii, Nazarene and Daystar were present. Riara, Egerton and Kabarak were not in attendance but they had sent their comments beforehand.

We had all been discussing partnerships, collaboration, internationalisation as well as exchanging ideas and suggestions that could help enrich and improve the Fred Ojiambo report on legal education status and reforms.

As we walked out of the room, towards the Pathways for Prosperity event, Masiyiwa remarked that untold changes will happen in law with the advent of Artificial Intelligence. He added, “If we thought that the mobile phone and the internet were great inventions, just you wait to witness Artificial Intelligence, AI”.

In today’s world, innovation is no longer close at hand, but in your very hands. From your own office, couch, kitchen, kiosk or matatu, you have got the power to change the way the world functions.

THE CHALLENGE OF CHANGE

Change brings unexpected challenges. Law, ethics and morality cannot be the ones holding change back. On the contrary, they must be tools for sustainable change.

Not every change is good. Ethics analyses change through moral lenses, and calls on law to direct that change towards the common good of humanity.

Law points the direction to follow, and the courts ensure we keep that course. Part of the great challenge of today’s justice system is that the world has changed, but courts have not. In this regard, we lawyers are guilty as charged, for we hang on to this old outdated court system just like traditional taxi drivers fought the unavoidable change Uber brought to our lives.

OLD COURTS MUST CHANGE

Courts, as we know them today, must disappear. We cannot continue having the same systems, procedures and papers we used to have a thousand years ago.

I dream of the courts of the future, where cases could be resolved within a few weeks or even days. Judges, advocates and witnesses could work and present documents and evidence through virtual systems, for registries will be in the Cloud. All direct contact that encourages corruption would be restricted and properly audited.

I dream with the end of papers, dusty registries, personal appearances, cash transactions and language barriers. Microsoft, Google and Apple are competing to create simultaneous translation systems via Skype, Hangout and Facetime.

This dream is close at hand; it is not impossible, and it is already happening at the Dispute Resolution Authority (DRA) in Dubai.

DUBAI’S COURTS OF THE FUTURE

DRA started as a pilot project in 2004. The pilot was so successful and attracted so many investors to Dubai that in 2014, Dubai’s ruler, Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, harmonised the laws to bring these courts fully into the judicial system.

DRA delivers justice to investors in the Middle East. Its divisions work in partnership to provide businesses with unparalleled choice about how to resolve their commercial disputes, to develop legal talent and to protect individuals investing or living in Dubai.

DRA’s mission statement says, “Together, the divisions of the DRA are helping to support the Dubai Plan 2021, Expo 2020 & UAE Vision 2021 to make the UAE the Preferred Place to Live, Work & Visit.” Microsoft has been a big player in this dream.

We are approaching the world of artificial intelligence (AI). The world is changing; law will change; lawyers must change. Unimaginable and exciting challenges are ahead of us. ‘I see something beautiful on the horizon.’

WHOM DO I RUN OVER?

In a small group discussion with exceedingly clever young future scholars and policymakers, we were conversing about development, law and ethics.

At some point, one of the students, Kimberly Mureithi, a third-year law student who had just won her second moot competition in two months, geared towards a dilemma she learnt from Harvard’s professor Michael Sandel. The “trolley dilemma”.

As Kimberly explained her point, three graduate assistants, Kasyoka Mutunga, Cecil Abungo and Grace Diida, immediately saw the connection between Sandel’s dilemma and AI. We are inventing self-driving cars. There is an expensive award-winning brood mare (a female thoroughbred that is used for breeding) and an old man on the way. A collision is unavoidable…who should be hit?

The mare or the man? What a dilemma. What considerations will the coder take into consideration? Human dignity? Animal rights? Economic gains versus loses? What would be the cheaper option? Who is more financially viable?

VICTIMS OF TODAY’S UNCOMMON SENSE

What is the value of life and why? Whose life matters most? In today’s confused world anything could happen. We have undermined common sense; this will shake and test the limits of our techie future.

Today’s utilitarian world speaks of euthanasia as a sensible way out, elephant poaching as a crime, yet we eat cows, bulls, goats and chickens, and we pay no attention to the ‘pigicidal’ tendencies of bacon lovers.

We do jogging, weight lifting, drink carrot juice and eat healthy…so that we may die healthy. We are in search of a healthy death. A kind of ‘I’m dying but I feel good’ approach.

AI will open a Pandora’s box; we must be prepared. Law must be an agent of change, not an obstacle to progress. Our outdated court system, laws and policies are not fit to face these challenges.

These uncommon problems will only be properly handled through good policies, good laws, and well-thought-out justice systems, founded on common sense for the common good.

Dr Franceschi is the dean of Strathmore Law School. [email protected]; Twitter: @lgfranceschi


VISIT THE SOURCE ARTICLE
Author:


VISIT THE SOURCE ARTICLE
Author: administrator

This is where the future of clean energy will come from | WARFAREWEB.COM

Spread the love

By now, we all know that global warming is slowly boiling our planet. We also understand that a long list of human activities is the main cause behind it, and that our insatiable hunger for energy is at the top of this list. Yet, our current solutions are lagging behind the raising temperatures and the resulting climate change. Renewable energy sources are only half of the solution to tackle global warming. The other half is energy efficiency. Our housing, retail and production systems waste gigantic amounts of energy, often in form of excess heat. How do we slash this waste? The answer is fairly simple: water. That is, with a smart thermal water grid.

When we think about future energy systems, we usually think only of electricity. We imagine smart power grids that integrate and deliver electricity for different purposes, like powering household appliances and commercial buildings, or charging electric vehicles. What power grids cannot do is to dramatically reduce the amount of energy that is wasted at the source of the energy application. Here is where the power grid’s twin – the smart thermal water grid – comes into play.

The idea is to take district heating to the next level. Think this: today, supermarkets produce copious amounts of excess heat to keep their freezers on 24/7, factories have stoves heating 24/7 and all sorts of industrial sites that need to cool or heat just keep releasing energy. This heat is simply released in the air or in the sea, meaning that we are heating birds and fish; and they just don’t need nor want the temperature to change. We could retain that excess heat and distribute it by redirecting it to where it is needed. Buildings, supermarkets and factories could exchange surplus heat and cooling directly with each other and cater to residential buildings. We just need the distribution system to make it happen. The beauty is that most countries already have all the energy they need for heating and cooling – they just can’t redistribute it.

A smart thermal water grid would do just that. And much more. By expanding and integrating existing district heating infrastructure, one would be able to use the excess heat coming from any wasteful source – e.g. from the production of electricity, chemical plants, the refrigeration systems of commercial and industrial sites and so on – at scale. It doesn’t stop there, because studies have shown that, once this water distribution system is in place, it becomes cheap and effective to add renewable energy sources to it. Osmotic, solar, geothermal energy can be attached, giant heat pumps can recycle the energy from floods, biofuels and incineration plants can feed in as well.

The road to energy efficiency is in theory a sustainability sweepstake. More efficiency means that less fuel is required to generate a given amount of energy, which in turns means lower costs for the provider and cheaper prices for the customers. At the same time, the grid creates new jobs for the design, construction and management of new energy infrastructure. Last but not least, a lower consumption would pave the way to a greater energy independence – and therefore energy security. Who would want loads of Russian gas, if we could get all the heat we need from our own surplus? Who needs tons of Middle Eastern oil, when we can integrate limitless renewable sources in our smart grids?

At this point, someone might still be wondering why we need a smart grid and what I mean by “smart” grid in the first place. The problem with most renewable sources is that they fluctuate. The sun doesn´t always shine, the wind doesn´t always blow. This is why, if we want to rely on renewables, we need intelligent systems that integrate and coordinate different sources of energy at scale, so that when one is scarce or unavailable, the other ones can automatically compensate.

In Europe, some companies are already developing parts of this vision on a big scale, and a unique project of smart energy system is currently taking off in Copenhagen. It is not by chance that Europe is taking the lead on energy efficiency, since today the heat wasted in the Old Continent is more than what is required to heat all its buildings. A pan-European smart thermal water grid would have a huge impact on the environment and on the economy of the world’s biggest marketplace.

To adopt clean and efficient energy systems worldwide, we need to support their development and implementation on a political level – in fact, top-down decisions. District heating markets often lack regulations to ensure transparency and protect customers from unfair pricing (London is case in point). In addition, despite all talks about climate change and green energy, our governments are still supporting the consumption of fossil fuels. In 2015 the global amount of subsidies for fossil fuels reached an unbelievable $5.3tn – that is $10m every minute! The scope of research and development in renewables that could be achieved with such funding is simply mind-blowing.

To save this planet, political leaders must take immediate action to ensure we reuse and generate the energy we all need in a sustainable way. For all the talk about smart grids and electrification, water is the faster, cheaper way. Speaking about energy, the smart thermal water grid is a the most efficient and overlooked big-idea out there.

Share


VISIT THE SOURCE ARTICLE
Author: Jens Martin Skibsted || World Economic Forum

Why Artificial Intelligence Is The Future Of Accounting: Report | NEURALSCULPT

Spread the love

By 2020, artificial intelligence will be able to fully automate accounting tasks, as well as other financial tasks like tax, payroll, audits and banking. (Photo by Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

After decades stuck in research labs, artificial intelligence (AI) is ready for prime-time, transforming if not disrupting all the sectors of the economy that generate lots of data (big data), from tech to finance, communications, energy, healthcare, mobility or manufacturing.

More than most other industries, accounting hasn’t seen much innovation since the creation of double-entry bookkeeping – a process of recording both profits and losses – and considered one of the greatest advances in the history of business and commerce.

That was over 500 years ago!

However, the good news is that applying AI and machine learning technologies to bookkeeping, is becoming a reality with most of the major accounting software vendors (Intuit, OneUp, Sage, and Xero) currently offering capabilities to automate data entry, reconciliations and sometimes more.

In our upcoming report on the future of accounting, we expect that by 2020, accounting tasks – but also tax, payroll, audits, banking… – will be fully automated using AI-based technologies, which will disrupt the accounting industry in a way it never was for the last 500 years, bringing both huge opportunities and serious challenges.

Artificial intelligence will not eliminate accountants

“Having machines to do all these tedious and repetitive tasks could sound scary for many accountants because they are also very time-consuming and thus very lucrative,” explained Stephanie Weil, CEO of Accounteam, a Silicon Valley-based accounting firm. “However, if the AI system is well configured, it can eliminate accounting errors that are generally hard to find and thereby reduce our liability and allows us to move to a more advisory role.”


VISIT THE SOURCE ARTICLE
Author:


VISIT THE SOURCE ARTICLE
Author: administrator

Watch: The History of the Beetle – VWVortex | THEVOLKSWAGEN.COM

Spread the love

By now the story of how the Beetle came to be is well known. But that doesn’t mean there’s no enjoyment to be had out of hearing it told well.

Donut media’s Up to Speed series previously covered the Golf, and now it’s back at Volkswagen, to tell the story of how the Beetle, and by extension the brand, came to be.

But for a few awkward tangents where the host loses focus, the story is well told in a quick-fire, light-hearted kind of way.

It may not be the first time you’ve heard the story of the Beetle, and it won’t be the last, but does it ever really get old?


VISIT THE SOURCE ARTICLE
Author: Sebastien Bell

By now the story of how the Beetle came to be is well known. But that doesn’t mean there’s no enjoyment to be had out of hearing it told well. Donut media’s Up to Speed series previously covered the Golf, and now it’s back at Volkswagen, to tell the story of how the Beetle, and […]

The post Watch: The History of the Beetle appeared first on VWVortex.

NEXs and Navy Lodges to Remain During Government Shutdown | WARFAREWEB.COM

Spread the love

By Kristine M. Sturkie, Navy Exchange Service Command Public Affairs

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (NNS) — NEXs and Navy Lodges worldwide will remain open during the U.S. government shutdown.

“NEXs and Navy Lodges are non-appropriated funded activities and therefore will not be affected by any government shutdown,” said Rear Adm. Robert J. Bianchi (Ret), Chief Executive Officer, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM). “Customers can still purchase the products and services they need at any NEX around the world. At this time, our stores will continue to operate at their normal hours and our Navy Lodges will remain open for our military families.”

NEXCOM’s mission is to provide quality goods and services at a savings and to support Navy quality of life programs.

For more information, visit www.navy.mil, www.facebook.com/usnavy, or www.twitter.com/usnavy.

For more news from Navy Exchange Service Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/nexcom/.


VISIT THE SOURCE ARTICLE
Author: || navy.mil

VW brings unique car sales model to Rwanda | THEVOLKSWAGEN.COM

Spread the love

By IVAN R. MUGISHA
More by this Author

By ALLAN OLINGO
More by this Author

A taxi ride in Kigali will soon be in a brand new vehicle, off the manufacturing line of German carmaker Volkswagen after the firm decided to build a value chain for its plant in Rwanda with its own hailing app.

The company announced last week it would start production of the Teramont large SUV, Hatchback Polo and the Passat sedan in Rwanda and create a captive market with an app, a rival to Uber, which has not entered the country because there are no vehicle age limit restrictions.

Further down the chain, investors in the vehicles will employ riders, answering one of President Paul Kagame’s key prayer of creating employment, especially for the youth.

On Thursday, the car manufacturer confirmed that it will be investing $20 million in a new vehicle assembly plant and car rental services in the country. The first vehicle is expected to come off the assembly line in the first half of this year.

Its strategy of going through a car hailing service to provide a direct market for its vehicles will set apart its investment in the region.

Last year, the carmaker invested $300 million in Gett, a firm which seeks to outmanoeuvre Uber by waiving “surge” pricing at peak traffic times.

Much more like the Uber taxi services in Uganda, Tanzania and Kenya, its car hailing services in Rwanda will operate through an online app, using around 150 vehicles for car pooling.

Thomas Schaefer, chairman and managing director of Volkswagen South Africa, said Volkswagen was ready to roll out its unique integrated locomotive solution system in Kigali.

“This will be followed by a ride hailing service with some initial 150 vehicles planned in the medium term in 2018. In 2019 public car sharing with an initial 250 cars will be launched and this will be followed by a shuttle service,” said Mr Schaefer.

It is also understood that a local technology firm Awesomity won the tender to partner with Volkswagen to develop the innovative transport mobility solutions IT application, bringing into focus Rwanda’s intent to build local capacity and also promote the local content rule for investors.

“I was impressed by these young techies from Awesomity who won the tender by Volkswagen to build the ride hailing application. They are tasked with developing an innovative transport mobility solutions IT application and I can’t wait to see the outcome,” said Clare Akamanzi, the chief executive officer of Rwanda Development Board.

“Think Blue”

Volkswagen Mobility Solutions Rwanda has already been registered to begin its operations in the country. It will rely on its Kenyan unit for experience in running the retail and production operation in Kigali as it seeks to build its Rwandan market.

The Rwandan unit will be led by lawyer Anastase Rutabingwa as its resident director.

“We are now fully committed to implementing our unique integrated automotive mobility solutions in Rwanda. We have finalised the layout of what we plan to do and some of the equipment including training materials and equipment are already sailing towards Mombasa port for delivery to Kigali,” said Mr Schaefer.

The models that the company expects to assemble in Rwanda are said to be far friendlier to the environment than the company’s older models and are in line with its “Think Blue” concept aimed at producing vehicles with low emissions.

The Rwandan plant got the nod to build more units than the Kenyan unit, which just does the Polo — this could be attributed to the investment incentives Kigali offered the firm.

“We chose Rwanda because there is political stability, zero tolerance for corruption, growth of seven per cent and a young and tech savvy population. VW received strong support from the Rwandan government and co-operation from RDB. The country is also spearheading the Smart City agenda,” said Mr Schaefer.

Affordability

VW will also not determine the price and affordability of these vehicles to Rwandans, but noted that the company was not looking to amass profits in the first phase of its operations.

“We are not here to make a buck; there will not be quick returns. We are here for the long term,” said Mr Schaefer.

This could explain the move to tag along a ride hailing app to offer a ready market for businesses or individuals who will want to own these cars and also have them for business.

Currently, the country doesn’t have a strict age limitations on car imports, which has discouraged firms like Uber, which banks on newer cars for their services, from launching in the market.

The Rwandan assembly unit is expected to have an annual installed capacity of up to 5,000 units.

Last week in a meeting with Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta in Durban, Mr Schaefer said they were looking to double production in the country and to introduce a new model at its Kenyan plant, possibly a hatchback (small SUV), while doubling production of the VW Polo Vivo to at least 300 vehicles.

The German carmaker said it will create about 1,000 new jobs in its first phase of the Rwandan operations. RDB announced last week that Rwanda registered a record $1.67 billion worth of investments in 2017, an increase of $515 million from the previous year.

“This project is in line with the government’s policies to protect the environment, create jobs, and reduce our trade deficit. We are confident that this partnership will help create countless opportunities for young Rwandans not only in terms of employment but also in terms of skills transfer,” said Ms Akamanzi.

In May last year, sub-Saharan Africa became the fourth region of operations within the Volkswagen Group, the others being China, South America and North America.


VISIT THE SOURCE ARTICLE
Author:

… manufacturing line of German carmaker Volkswagen after the firm decided to … and managing director of Volkswagen South Africa, said Volkswagen was ready to … the tender to partner with Volkswagen to develop the innovative transport … officer of Rwanda Development Board.
Volkswagen Mobility Solutions Rwanda has already …

SitRep: Hawaii Missile Alert Caused by Pushing Wrong Button; Nuclear Posture Review Leaks | LIBERAL.GUIDE

Spread the love
By Elias Groll, Dan De Luce, Sharon Weinberger, and Robbie Gramer Fat fingers. Officials in Hawaii are beginning to sort through just how the state’s emergency alert system incorrectly told residents on Saturday that a ballistic missile was speeding toward the island. The results aren’t pretty: Early reports indicate that the wrong button was pushed …

VISIT THE SOURCE ARTICLE
Author: Elias Groll