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Major teachers union cuts ties with Wells Fargo over its relationship with the NRA

The American Federation of Teachers (AFT), with 1.7 million members, has officially cut ties with banking giant Wells Fargo for the company’s ongoing relationship with the National Rifle Association (NRA). According to USA Today, the move came after Wells Fargo declined to heed the union’s recommendation that it forgo its lending relationship with the gun lobbying group or impose new restriction…

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Major teachers union cuts ties with Wells Fargo over its relationship with the NRA


Russian drug kingpin Alexandre Sitnikov arrested

Viktor Ivanov, the head of The Federal Drug Control Service of the Russian Federation (FDCS), met diplomats from 46 countries and gave them information about drug dealers. Names and addresses of these criminals were identified during special operation “Mosaic”. The list includes 1,500 names, 1,180 are citizens of the USA. According to LEA the criminal community consisted of about 10,000…

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As teacher struggles spread, unions redouble effort to suppress class struggle

In the aftermath of the nine-day strike by West Virginia teachers, American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten said that the unions are necessary to contain opposition. VISIT THE SOURCE ARTICLE Author:

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The Future of Retail: What’s real and what’s hype after NRF 2018?

If you attended the National Retail Federation (NRF) Conference this January – and perhaps even if you didn’t – you probably heard about the award-winning Cisco ToyBox

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Cisco at NRF and the foundation for digital transformation | NETWORKFIGHTS.COM

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With the National Retail Federation in full swing, the Cisco booth is bustling with visitors. The team has deployed its Toy Box – a fully functional toy store featuring solutions for seamless experiences among shoppers, store associates, managers, and IT teams.

The Toy Box demonstrates how Cisco and our partners help make the entire retail tech stack possible. CMX beacons enable a “customer” to navigate to a particular item in the store on their mobile device. RFID tags automatically notify “store associates” of shelves that need to be restocked. Dynamic signage changes as “customers” engage with particular products. These are just a few of the more than 20 retail technology solutions highlighted in the booth.

This kind of digital transformation enables retailers to operate seamlessly with automated information communicated in real time – creating significant operational cost savings. For customers, convenient shopping is critical. With many shoppers buying online, seamless, digital, in-store experiences will keep bringing customers into brick and mortar spaces.

At the Big Ideas discussion panel, featuring Michael Wojicik from , Rob Massie (Senior Director of Enterprise and Store Systems for Dollar General), Guillermo Diaz, Jr. (SVP and CIO of Cisco), and Kathryn Howe (Director for Retail and Hospitality in the US Digital Transformation).  They addressed the topic of retailers’ priorities when it comes to adopting retail technology solutions. The advice remained consistent across the board – focus on your technology foundation, because it really will serve as that.

During the panel, Guillermo explained the importance of a secure technology foundation guiding your retail transformation, comparing it to a house.

Retail operates similarly – retailers who jump to develop various web applications and deploy solutions such as mobile payments, connected inventory, or way finding solutions, might lose sight of their essential base platform. These solutions are game changers in bringing retailers greater ROI, as long as they operate on a network with a secure data center, cloud infrastructure, and collaboration platforms that integrates security through the tech stack.

The Toy Box brings solutions that enhance associate productivity and improve customer experiences to life, all with Cisco’s secure technology foundation. Retailers can have the confidence that these retail transformation solutions will help enable the greatest value to their organization today and prepare them for the future.

For additional details on our Cisco presence at NRF, visit our website.


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Author: Nicki Vereschagin
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The Annual Report | WARFAREWEB.COM

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Russian Federation President Vladimir Putin addressed an expanded session of the MOD Collegium at the new RVSN training facility in Balashikha on December 22.

According to the Kremlin.ru transcript, Putin gave attention to Syria, where he said the Russian Federation Armed Forces displayed “qualitatively developed modern capabilities” to deliver the “decisive contribution” to the defeat of international terrorists.

Putin said Russian arms and equipment will be nearly 60 percent modern by the end of 2017, and 70 percent by 2021. Again that word modern. Russia, he declared, will be a world leader in developing a “new generation” army.

The Russian leader took pains to accuse the U.S. of violating the 1987 INF Treaty.

He indicated Moscow’s priorities in the next GPV will be precision weapons,  unmanned strike systems, individual soldier systems, reconnaissance, communications, and EW systems. Not very different from what he said last year.

Preserving strategic nuclear parity is a perennial priority. Putin said the Russian triad would be 79 percent modern at end of 2017. By 2021, Russian ground-based ICBMs are supposed to be 90 percent modern.

Russia’s president also called for strengthening the SSO and VDV.

All in all, there’s less of interest in Putin’s report than Shoygu’s.

Shoygu

Shoygu had much to say about Syria as a training ground for the Russian Army and Russian pilots. Some figures were new. Others we’ve heard before.

He said 48,000 Russian troops fought in Syria over the last two years. The Aerospace Forces (VKS) flew 34,000 combat missions. The Navy delivered 100 strikes, presumably Kalibr LACMs. Long-Range Aviation flew 66 strike missions. Shoygu reported that 60,318 enemy fighters were killed, including 819 leaders and 2,840 Russian Federation expatriates.

Then the head of the MOD got to what the Russian military received in 2017:

  • Three mobile RVSN regiments were fully reequipped with RS-24 Yars ICBMs;
  • LRA got three modernized bombers;
  • The army got 2,055 new or modernized systems to reequip three formations [divisions or brigades] and 11 units [regiments];
  • VKS received 191 aircraft and 143 air and missile defense systems;
  • Ten ships and boats, 13 support ships, and four land-based Bal (SSC-6 / Sennight) and Bastion (SSC-5 / Stooge) ASCM systems entered the Navy. Naval aviation got 15 aircraft;
  • VDV acquired 184 armored vehicles and SP guns;
  • The armed forces got 59 UAV systems with 199 UAVs;
  • The Unified Tactical Level Command and Control System (YeSU TZ) now meets the MOD’s requirements and was used successfully in combat training.

Compare this list with 2016. And for reference, with year-enders for 2015 and 2014.

Shoygu expounded on the list of weapons and equipment acquired since 2012. It was originally outlined in less detail by Deputy Defense Minister Yuriy Borisov in a November 1 interview with VPK. The list included:

  • 80 ICBMs;
  • 102 SLBMs;
  • Three Borey-class SSBNs;
  • 55 satellites;
  • 3,237 tanks and combat vehicles;
  • More than 1,000 planes and helicopters;
  • 150 ships and vessels;
  • Six proyekt 636.3 Improved Kilo diesel-electric submarines;
  • 13 Bal (SSC-5 / Stooge) and Bastion (SSC-6 / Sennight) launchers.

Shoygu said this procurement enabled the MOD to outfit:

  • 12 RVSN regiments with RS-24 Yars ICBMs;
  • 10 missile brigades with Iskander-M SRBMs;
  • 12 regiments with MiG-31BM, Su-35S, Su-30SM, and Su-34 aircraft;
  • Three army aviation brigades and six regiments with Ka-52 and Mi-28 helicopters;
  • 16 air defense regiments with S-400 SAMs;
  • 19 battalions with Pantsir-S gun-missile systems;
  • 13 battalions with Bal and Bastion ASCMs;
  • 35 formations with Ratnik-2 individual soldier systems;
  • Six new Voronezh radar systems and refurbished Daryal, Dnepr, and Volga systems.

The Defense Minister said the Russian Armed Forces now have 59.5 percent modern arms and equipment. Specific service percentages are:

  • RVSN — 79 percent;
  • Ground Troops — 45 percent;
  • Aerospace Forces — 73 percent;
  • Navy — 53 percent.

Much of what’s claimed seems like it happened. Some seems disputable. “More than 1,000 airplanes and helicopters” seems a stretch. CAST counted 370 fighters and trainers since 2012. Do helos and transports account for the other 630? Other claims are useful starting points but require research.

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Author: Russian Defense Policy